Paralegal speaks out about electroconvulsive therapy controversies

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A paralegal who worked for law firm representing a man with total autobiographical memory loss following electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) shares his insights on the controversial treatment after extensive research on the topic.

Summary: Electroshock treatment, termed electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) by psychiatrists, is the induction of an artificial grand mal seizure in an individual by passing electricity through the brain. This paper addresses three aspects of this practice – its efficacy, its most salient effect, memory loss, and brain
damage. In examining these issues it becomes apparent that psychiatry’s policy has been to put a positive spin on dismal results, to limit research and investigation, and to tell the public as little as possible about the actual outcomes of ECT. In other words, don’t look, don’t tell.

Richard A. Warner,
Shock Treatment: Efficacy, Memory Loss, and Brain Damage – Psychiatry’s Don’t Look, Don’t Tell Policy

Read Shock Treatment: Efficacy, Memory Loss, and Brain Damage – Psychiatry’s Don’t Look, Don’t Tell Policy


Did you know ECT (electroconvulsive therapy) has never been FDA safety tested, nor is it standardized or regulated? Learn why this matters and how you can help. 

Audit ECT Campaign  

 

Anna

Anna is a childhood psychiatric drug and a teenage electroshock survivor. She founded Life After ECT to ensure people injured by electroconvulsive therapy have easy access to resources that can help them understand their injuries and find a path to recovery.

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